Friday, December 24, 2010

More Dominant Pitching, 2010


3.75+ K/BB, 1.15 WHIP or lower, 160+ IP (2010)
Cliff Lee (Mariners/Rangers) 10.28 K/BB, 1.00 WHIP
Roy Halladay (Phillies) 7.30, 1.04
Jered Weaver (Angels) 4.31, 1.07
Josh Johnson (Marlins) 3.88, 1.11
Shaun Marcum (Blue Jays) 3.84, 1.15
Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) 3.80, 1.05
Mat Latos (Padres) 3.78, 1.08
Ted Lilly (Cubs/Dodgers) 3.77, 1.08

Not too many surprises, and it's one more reminder how great the Phillies' rotation should be next year.  Shaun Marcum was traded to the Brewers earlier this month, and he could be part of a good rotation in 2011 (with Zack Greinke and Yovani Gallardo).  He had missed all of 2009 after Tommy John surgery and had much better control (2 BB/9 from 3 BB/9 in 2008). 

Ted Lilly pitched even better after being traded to the Dodgers (5.13 K/BB, .991 WHIP; 3.07 K/BB, 1.14 WHIP with Cubs), which could bode well because he signed a 3 year contract with them (his ERA was much better at Dodger Stadium than Wrigley Field).

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Dominant Pitching, 2010


3.00 ERA or lower, 1.00 WHIP or lower (2010)

Pre All-Star Break, 50+ IP
Josh Johnson (Marlins)  1.70 ERA, .96 WHIP, 122 IP
Adam Wainwright (Cardinals) 2.11, 1.00, 136.1
Mat Latos (Padres) 2.45, .97, 106.2
Cliff Lee (Mariners/Rangers) 2.64, .95, 112.2

Post All-Star Break, 50+ IP
Felix Hernandez (Mariners) 1.53 ERA, .94 WHIP, 112 IP
Daniel Hudson (White Sox/D-Backs) 2.07, .94, 91.1
Cole Hamels (Phillies) 2.23, 1.00, 96.2
Roy Oswalt (Phillies) 2.36, .99, 91.2
Tommy Hanson (Braves) 2.51, .98, 100.1
Jeremy Guthrie (Orioles) 2.76, .99, 98
Hiroki Kuroda (Dodgers) 2.87, .94, 94
Matt Cain (Giants) 2.91, .93, 102

2010 Season, 70+ IP
Daniel Bard (Red Sox) 1.93 ERA, 1.00 WHIP, 74.2 IP
Daniel Hudson (White Sox/D-Backs) 2.95, 1.00, 95.1

Sunday, December 19, 2010

Lowest ERA in 1st Season


Lowest ERA, 20+ IP (1st Season, Since 1900)
0.00 Harry Coveleski (1907, Phillies)
0.38 Joba Chamberlain (2007, Yankees)
0.38 Buck O'Brien (1911, Red Sox)
0.39 Cliff Markle (1915, Yankees)
0.40 Joel Johnston (1991, Royals)
0.44 Craig Kimbrel (2010, Braves)
0.66 George McQuillan (1907, Phillies)
0.67 Kenley Jansen (2010, Dodgers)

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Carl Crawford


.280+ BA, 100+ HR, 250+ SB (Age 29, 1900-2010)
Cesar Cedeno
Rickey Henderson
Ryne Sandberg
Barry Bonds
Roberto Alomar
Edgar Renteria
Carl Crawford

Carl Crawford is most similar to Roberto Alomar and Cesar Cedeno at his current age, which is excellent company, but neither of them played well into their mid or late 30's.  After having one of his best seasons in 1980, Cedeno (who turned 30 in 1981), began his decline and never stole more than 20 bases again.  Alomar had four more quality seasons in him, but he declined in 2002 and retired when he was 36.

Crawford is signed for 7 years with the Red Sox, through age 36, so he will have a chance to become the first player in ML history with 35+ SB and 15+ HR in a season after the age of 32.

Monday, December 6, 2010

Mark Reynolds and the Orioles


Mark Reynolds may be a good acquisition for the Orioles, who haven't had anyone hit 35 HR since Albert Belle in 1999.  Mark Reynolds hit 32 HR in 2010 and 44 HR for the D-Backs in 2009, so he has power.  He is also one of the greatest (if not the greatest) strikeout machine in ML history.  The Orioles have been pretty good throughout their history at avoiding huge strikeout seasons, but that is going to end.

Orioles (1954-2010)
160 Mickey Tettleton (1990)
125 Boog Powell (1966)
119 Adam Jones (2010)
119 Lee May (1977)

ML History (1900-2010)
223 Mark Reynolds (2009)
211 Mark Reynolds (2010)
204 Mark Reynolds (2008)
199 Adam Dunn (2010)
199 Ryan Howard (2007)
199 Ryan Howard (2008)

Saturday, December 4, 2010

Derek Jeter: The Next 3 Years


It looks like Derek Jeter will be returning to the Yankees for 3 more years, during which he will mostly be between the ages of 37 and 39.  While the Yankees are certainly hoping that he can bounce back from one of his least productive seasons ever (he did score 111 runs, but his OPS was .710). 

He's probably never going to put up MVP-type numbers like he did in 1998, 1999 or 2006, but he could hit around .300 over the course of his new contract.  Even if he has a decline, Jeter is a great candidate to join this list in a few years. 

He's a future Hall of Famer, and he'll be hitting at the top of one of the best lineups in baseball as long as he's a Yankee.  What this shows is how rare it is for players to continue to put up quality numbers in their late 30's, but Jeter and the Yankees must believe he will be one of them for $17 million a year.

.290+ BA, 240+ R, age 37-39 (RHB, 1900-2010)

Bob Johnson, 1943-45

Hank Aaron, 1971-73
Paul Molitor, 1994-96


.290+ BA, 240+ R, age 37-39 (LHB, 1900-2010)

Jake Daubert, 1921-23

Ty Cobb, 1924-26

Eddie Collins, 1924-26
Tris Speaker, 1925-27
Sam Rice, 1927-29
Babe Ruth, 1932-34

Ted Williams, 1956-58

Barry Bonds, 2002-04


.290+ BA, 240+ R, age 37-39 (SH, 1900-2010)
Pete Rose, 1978-1980
 
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